With the passing of another St. Patrick’s day we are all reminded that we can all be Irish for a day!  If you are like anyone I know, dear old Mr. Murphy doesn’t just strike the Irish.  So in the wake of green beer and memories likely blocked by Irish Whiskey and good times check out Kinetic Development Group and their No Mr. Murphy Morale patch!  While you are there be sure to check out their AR parts, gear and apparel 

According to kinetic Development:

Mission plans are like Bar Crawls; everything was going great until Murphy showed up…

 We all have met Mr. Murphy, and we have yet to meet anyone that likes the guy. He’s been giving the Irish a bad name since before Saint Pat murdered all those snakes with his trusty Shillelagh.  Any military man or woman can tell you all about Mr. Murphy; well known for his universal law. Murphy likes to make frequent appearances right before uniform inspections, after you have bought nonrefundable plane tickets for your upcoming leave request, and during combat operations. According to old military superstitions, if you get three or more officers together to talk, he will appear in mere moments.

We here at KDG aren’t going to sugar coat it, we flat out hate Mr. Murphy. We asked our resident red-bearded Irishman Daniel O’Brien his thoughts on the matter, and he said, “If it wasn’t for Murphy and whiskey, Ireland would be a World superpower!” Collectively, KDG harbors an overwhelming, unrepentant amount of hatred for Mr. Murphy, and strive to avoid him at all cost.  The patches are Velcro backed for attaching to plate carriers and hats, and are constructed out of high quality PVC material. PVC is a good choice for the spirit of Murphy’s Law, since it’s stain proof construction allows for green-tinted vomit to be easily washed off!   

Read the real origin of Murphy’s Law below.

https://kineticdg.com/product/no-mr-murphy-pvc-morale-patch/

Murphy’s Law (“If anything can go wrong, it will”) was born at Edwards Air Force Base in 1949, and
was named after Capt. Edward A. Murphy. Captain Murphy worked as an engineer on Air Force Project MX981, which was designed to see how much sudden deceleration a person can stand in an aircraft crash.

One day, after finding that a transducer was wired wrong, he cursed the technician responsible and said, “If there is any way to do it wrong, he’ll find it.” The contractor’s project manager kept a list of “laws” and added this one, which he called Murphy’s Law.

Shortly afterwards, the Air Force doctor (Dr. John Paul Stapp) who rode a sled on the deceleration track to a stop, pulling 40 Gs, gave a press conference. He said that their good safety record on the project was due to a firm belief in Murphy’s Law and in the necessity to try and circumvent it.

Aerospace manufacturers picked it up and used it widely in their ads during the next few months, and soon it was being quoted in many news and magazine articles. Murphy’s Law was born.

 

-Sean McDaniel